A Look Back at Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart on its 60th Anniversary

Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is a classic of the Nigerian literary canon. It’s a story set in a period in which the tragic colonialization of Africa as just beginning, a period when traditional African customs were forced to give way before the brutal invasion of  strange customs from a land called Britain. Read a review of the book and its politics: A Look Back at Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart for its 60th Anniversary

 

 

Black on Black Success!

Black people who live in communities in which Black institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are located become very successful. This is because the knowledge they acquire from the HBCUs empowers them to startup businesses and employ Black people in the communities. Read more about this via HBCUs Improve The Quality Of Life For Blacks Living In Their Cities | News One

 

 

How Smithsonian Helped Solve the Mystery of the Unknown [Black] Woman Scientist 

Sheila Minor was not, as some suggested, “support staff.” She was a biological research technician who went on to a 35-year-long scientific career

Source: How Smithsonian Helped Solve the Twitter Mystery of the Unknown Woman Scientist | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian

 

 

Kunta Kinteh & His Descendants Were Real Here’s The Proof & Video of Their Graves ~ Haki Kweli Shakur

The release of The Black Panther, the movie, showed the important role of representation in filmmaking to the conscientizing of Black people on the planet. There are numerous other films and TV series which spark similar interest, even if not on such a large scale. The mini-series “Roots” is one of those series. The original series aired in 1977 to critical acclaim, and the remake is no less successful. This article is about the impact of the series on the town of Spotsylvania in Viginia, and the discovery there of the grave of Kunta Kinte.

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Roots’ Program Catches Hold in Virginia ‘Home’ By Ken Ringle January 28, 1977 Washington Post Article source:https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1977/01/28/roots-program-catches-hold-in-virginia-home/efc04e56-baec-4567-9824-d86c177a527c/?utm_term=.51ae314f6063

When Judge A. (for Absalom) Nelson Waller, 73, turns on his television set each night this week to watch “Roots,” the dramatization of Alex Haley’s novel of his black family’s history, he does so with more than the casual interest of the average viewer.

Kunta Kinteh & His Descendants Burial Evidence Bethlehem Cementary Hennings Tennesee

Haki Kweli Shakur on The K.Kinte Show Video

Waller’s ancestors, no less than Haley’s are part of the story. The judge’s ancestors were the plantation owners who bought Haley’s great-great-great-grandfather, Kunta Kinte, on the slave block in Annapolis and bent him to a life of bondage on land that the Waller’s family still owns two centuries later.

Waller, a stocky bald man with the disposition of a playful bulldog, isn’t sure whether he likes the story or not. Like…

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Steeped in Tradition: Best Books to Understand Haiti’s Past and Present

Haitian history is defined by turmoil and upheaval, victory and freedom. In 1804, Haitian slaves won what is still regarded as the only successful slave revolution in history, to become the first free black state when the planet was being redefined by Caucasian genocidal geopolitics. These books provide an opening view into the fascinating world of Haitian literature.

Source – Penguin Random House: Steeped in Tradition: Best Books to Understand Haiti’s Past and Present

U.S. owes black people reparations for a history of ‘racial terrorism,’ says U.N. panel – The Washington Post

In 2016, the United Nations acknowledged that the United States owes reparations to the descendants of former slaves. So far, there has been no acknowledgement of this in Washington. Source: U.S. owes black people reparations for a history of ‘racial terrorism,’ says U.N. panel – The Washington Post

David Commissiong and Prof. Pedro Welch Discuss Reparations 

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is a global leader in the reparations discourse. Two Caribbean nationals, lawyer David Commissiong, and historian Professor Pedro Welch, both from Barbados, speak about the importance of keeping the issue of reparations for the descendants of victims of the slave trade within the public consciousness.