Black on Black Success!

Black people who live in communities in which Black institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are located become very successful. This is because the knowledge they acquire from the HBCUs empowers them to startup businesses and employ Black people in the communities. Read more about this via HBCUs Improve The Quality Of Life For Blacks Living In Their Cities | News One

 

 

A Journey Of A Thousand Miles Begins With One Step…

Tell your story.

 

 

Responding to the Creative “Ding!”

by Maggie Brito, PhD

When I attend to the Ding! at the time it Dings! I become absorbed in the layered, complex type of creative idea it tends to be.

Sometimes when I’m working an idea would pop into my awareness and kind of hover, as if it’s waiting for me to pick it like fruit from a tree. Ideas like these are fully formed, complete and finely detailed, and I’m usually excited by their unexpected appearance. Thing is, there are loads of other ideas in my mind already, and to attend to this new one means I have to take time away from the others I’m already attending to.

These new ideas come with a little “Ding!”, that is, a kind of alert that lets me know they’ve arrived. They tend to pop into my mind and go “Ding!” despite the fact that a lot of other ideas are already there, lined up in a mental queue, awaiting their turn to be attended to – essential tasks like emails to be answered, writing to be done for clients, content to compose for Facebook and Twitter, online meetings to attend, articles to be read – all these are the legitimate mental activities in which I engage during the course of any working day and then along comes this unscheduled “Ding!”

So what do I do? I have to make a decision: either attend to the unruly Ding! or put a pin in it and keep focused on the well-behaved, orderly, scheduled mental tasks I’ve lined up for the day. I have done both at various times, and have found that each choice brings a different result.

When I attend to the Ding! at the time it Dings! I become absorbed in the layered, complex type of creative idea it tends to be. I always enjoy the exploration of these ideas, because they seem to hook nicely into the higher-level layers of thinking I enjoy so much as a creative writer, such as metaphor, critical thinking, logic, all wrapped up in a kind of imaginative play as I give form to the idea.

The Ding! is usually creative, and some part of it is totally original; if not the idea itself, then some aspect of its execution. The reason I get excited when the Ding! arrives is because it signals a period when I can be completely authentic in my writing. And I just love how the Ding! rolls itself out in an auditory way, snuggling up among my regular thoughts, but possessing enough of its own bright quality as to be distinguished as its own peculiar kind of thought. I don’t hear it with my ears; it’s more an “inner” hearing. And though I can “see” the Ding! it’s with my inner vision. You know? The Ding! is kind of mystical, though entirely practical. It’s one of the inexplicable technologies with which humans are endowed.

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The Dinged! idea usually invites extended exploration, and while I enjoy it, I also feel I’m doing it at the expense of other pressing tasks I’ve put on hold, all of which have tight deadlines. There was actually a time I felt that the time I spent doing intensely creative work on the Ding! was “stolen” time, and so creative work became a kind of guilty, clandestine pleasure that was even more enjoyable because I felt I was doing it in stolen time. However, the creative work always turned out to have its own rewards, and not just enjoyment and emotional release, but it also benefited my career for a long time to come.

If I decide not to tune into the Ding! I find that by the time I do get around to it the bright, sharp quality it had when it first Dinged! had faded a bit. I liken this to the difference between picking a fruit at the point of ripeness and enjoying all that goodness right there, and letting the fruit sit for a while. Anyone who has picked a ripe mango or apple or strawberry and eaten it right there and then would know what I’m talking about. I’m from the Caribbean, and we do this all the time – pick a ripe fruit from a branch and eat it while it’s warm and filled with sunshine. When you eat the fruit after its finest moment has passed – maybe after letting it sit in the fridge for a bit – it’s still good, but not as good as before. Not only that, the emotional “skin” of this creative fruit, that part of the fruit that makes it enticing and irresistible (and where a lot of its substance happens to be) has faded a little, and some of the intricately filigreed details of the idea have gone as well.

Other times, when I finally decide to turn my attention to a neglected Ding! I find that it has dissipated entirely, like a burst bubble.

This doesn’t mean not attending to a Ding! when it Dings! is bad. There’re good reasons for putting a pin in a Ding! Both choices are valid, however, not responding to the creative Ding! delays my entry into my vision, for though the arrival of the Ding! is unscheduled, it’s not unsolicited. It’s a response to an idea I’ve been mulling over for some time and which I had de-accelerated to idle mode while I dealt with other things. The Ding! would pop into my awareness after being formed in the silent unknown on my unconscious.

Lately, however, I have been tending more and more to receive the Ding! no matter when it shows up.

Book Review: Ajani’s Wonderful Summer and the Imaging of the Black Boy

One aspect of the assault on the African family and on Black families has been the removal or lessening of the role of the father in the household.

The underachievement of boys in educational systems throughout the African diaspora, as well as the fact that the majority of perpetrators and victims of homicides, violent crimes and assaults in the diaspora are young men, are important issues that have been engaging the attention of people from all walks of life, for these are symptoms of crises occurring in Black communities and nation states.

Barbadian author, Dr. Akhentoolove Corbin, is concerned about the crises which exist in Black communities, especially as these affect Black boys. One of his major concerns is that many Black boys throughout the African diaspora grow up without a father figure in the house. We are well aware of this, for many of our Caribbean sociologists have drawn attention to this matter, and the absentee father has been one of the major themes of Caribbean sociology for a long time. Read More

 

 

How Smithsonian Helped Solve the Mystery of the Unknown [Black] Woman Scientist 

Sheila Minor was not, as some suggested, “support staff.” She was a biological research technician who went on to a 35-year-long scientific career

Source: How Smithsonian Helped Solve the Twitter Mystery of the Unknown Woman Scientist | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian

 

 

Kunta Kinteh & His Descendants Were Real Here’s The Proof & Video of Their Graves ~ Haki Kweli Shakur

The release of The Black Panther, the movie, showed the important role of representation in filmmaking to the conscientizing of Black people on the planet. There are numerous other films and TV series which spark similar interest, even if not on such a large scale. The mini-series “Roots” is one of those series. The original series aired in 1977 to critical acclaim, and the remake is no less successful. This article is about the impact of the series on the town of Spotsylvania in Viginia, and the discovery there of the grave of Kunta Kinte.

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Roots’ Program Catches Hold in Virginia ‘Home’ By Ken Ringle January 28, 1977 Washington Post Article source:https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1977/01/28/roots-program-catches-hold-in-virginia-home/efc04e56-baec-4567-9824-d86c177a527c/?utm_term=.51ae314f6063

When Judge A. (for Absalom) Nelson Waller, 73, turns on his television set each night this week to watch “Roots,” the dramatization of Alex Haley’s novel of his black family’s history, he does so with more than the casual interest of the average viewer.

Kunta Kinteh & His Descendants Burial Evidence Bethlehem Cementary Hennings Tennesee

Haki Kweli Shakur on The K.Kinte Show Video

Waller’s ancestors, no less than Haley’s are part of the story. The judge’s ancestors were the plantation owners who bought Haley’s great-great-great-grandfather, Kunta Kinte, on the slave block in Annapolis and bent him to a life of bondage on land that the Waller’s family still owns two centuries later.

Waller, a stocky bald man with the disposition of a playful bulldog, isn’t sure whether he likes the story or not. Like…

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Steeped in Tradition: Best Books to Understand Haiti’s Past and Present

Haitian history is defined by turmoil and upheaval, victory and freedom. In 1804, Haitian slaves won what is still regarded as the only successful slave revolution in history, to become the first free black state when the planet was being redefined by Caucasian genocidal geopolitics. These books provide an opening view into the fascinating world of Haitian literature.

Source – Penguin Random House: Steeped in Tradition: Best Books to Understand Haiti’s Past and Present

U.S. owes black people reparations for a history of ‘racial terrorism,’ says U.N. panel – The Washington Post

In 2016, the United Nations acknowledged that the United States owes reparations to the descendants of former slaves. So far, there has been no acknowledgement of this in Washington. Source: U.S. owes black people reparations for a history of ‘racial terrorism,’ says U.N. panel – The Washington Post

David Commissiong and Prof. Pedro Welch Discuss Reparations 

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is a global leader in the reparations discourse. Two Caribbean nationals, lawyer David Commissiong, and historian Professor Pedro Welch, both from Barbados, speak about the importance of keeping the issue of reparations for the descendants of victims of the slave trade within the public consciousness.

 

Readings from the Slave Narratives

African slaves in North America didn’t know how majestic they were before slavery; they just knew how oppressed they were. Many Black people still don’t remember our great past.

 

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Hayti, a Free eBook by Kurtis Sunday

During the Spanish Civil War a German anarchist and historian serving with the International Brigade discovered an account of how a Florentine nun led a mission to Hayti, Spain’s first American colony, two decades after its ‘discovery’ by Christopher Columbus. But she also had a secret assignment – to find out if the passage through to Asia depicted on a world map published by the German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller actually existed. During her investigations, she meets up with Fray Hugo de Montenegro, a Dominican monk who has been there for several years and has been collecting accounts of Spanish atrocities; and she comes into contact with Taíno freedom fighters and their allies, escaped African slaves who had been imported to work on the new sugar plantations, as well as to the attention of the brutal colonial authorities. The narrative unfolds against the background of the horrors of the Spanish Conquest of the Americas, the destruction of its original peoples, the commencement of the Atlantic slave trade and the beginnings of globalisation with the foundation of the Spanish Empire. But is it a factual account or the first work fiction written in the Americas?

Read the free ebook at

https://www.unglue.it/api/widget/288645/

 

A Black Radical Defense of the Second Amendment | Black Agenda Report

This article examines the impact of gun control in the USA from the point of view of Black owners of guns. Since Caucasian settlers needed to defend themselves against the indigenous people whose land they stole, the ideology of the right to bear arms became enshrined in the United States constitution. Black gun owners have historically used firearms as a defence against the hostile Caucasian dominated nation. But how would gun control affect their ability to protect themselves?

Read the full article in A Black Radical Defense of the Second Amendment | Black Agenda Report

Death of a Great Caribbean Author

We just ‘heard’ through the Twitter grapevine (thank you, Bocas Lit Fest) of the sad news of the passing of Guyanese author Sir Wilson Harris. To echo Bocas Lit Fest, “Harris has been one of the Caribbean’s literary giants for half a century.” In his honor, we share an excerpt from a 2010 interview with […]

via Sir Wilson Harris has passed away — Repeating Islands

The Black Panther: Symbol of Black Power in the Caucasian Paradigm

The image of the black panther is a symbol of Black Power, which bespeaks bravery, excellence and the willingness to use one’s skill to out-manoeuvre a cunning enemy with every intention of winning the fight. The symbol of the black panther enjoys a heritage rooted in authentic Black civilizations which flourished before the colonization of Black populations by the Caucasian paradigm.

The Black Panther movie has been described as the best movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), grossing, according to one estimate, $704 million worldwide within the first month of its release, making it the highest grossing film of 2018. It crushed box offices in the USA because of its immense patronage by Black audiences, precisely because of what the black panther has always represented for Black people – a symbol of Black power – a symbol, it is true, caught within the Caucasian paradigm, but one possessing a pedigree which both predates and transcends the paradigm.

As such, its dazzling success communicates a message about the consciousness of Black people at this time, the kind of knowledge we seek now, and what we expect of our artists, especially those who have been given much. Read More…